About Us

The Founder Years
The Company bears the name of the founder, Thomas Ferguson (27th April, 1820- 24th February,1900), who was born at Clare, near the village of Waringstown in Co. Down, where his father John farmed. At that time the locality was a centre of Irish Linen hand weaving and this activity was commonly combined with farming.

His father died in 1831, and he was orphaned, when his mother died in 1836. It is believed that the Rev. John Johnston (1786-1862) of Tullylish Presbyterian Church, became the guardian of Thomas, and his brother John. Thomas Ferguson's guardian saw to the completion of his schooling and then arranged for him to be apprenticed to Brice Smyth (1796-1851) of Brookfield, Banbridge. This remarkable man, even though he was blind from smallpox as a child, was a very skilful handloom weaver of fine linens, and a noted teacher of his trade. It was said Brice Smyth was also able to examine the brown webs as they were brought into his warehouse by the weavers, and in doing so he could have formed an accurate judgment as to whether or not the cloth had been correctly woven.

His apprenticeship completed, Thomas Ferguson left Brookfield sometime around 1845 and set up on his own as a handloom weaver in Banbridge. It is believed he started business in a house in Church Square, in the town. In 1854, by then firmly established, he acquired a lease for 999 years of the site on which the Company operated for 137 years. The factory on this site was known as Edenderry Works.

Company History

There he continued with his hand weaving business, until in 1866 he formed a partnership with his two brothers-in-law, James and Benjamin Dickson. Following the formation of this Company, Dickson, Ferguson & Co., the partners decided to build a new factory. Work was started in 1867 on the site which Thomas Ferguson had earlier bought, and the factory was equipped with power driven looms with Jacquard machines for damask weaving.

In 1883 the two Dickson brothers retired from the business. The Company with its present title was incorporated in 1884 with Thomas and his sons, Howard and Norman, being the first directors with another son, Thomas S. as secretary. In later years three grandsons of the founder entered the Company while two great-grandsons and one great-great-grandson were all actively involved in the business. To find out more about the history of linen in Banbridge and Thomas Ferguson.

Recent Years
In December 1988 Thomas Ferguson & Co. Ltd. joined the Franklins Group. This was formed by another textile Company based in Banbridge Franklins International Ltd. Franklins is the premier badge, label and embroidery specialist in the UK and Ireland and was founded in 1835, in Coventry.

Franklins International Ltd supplies to youth organisations, commercial companies, charities, military, security and emergency services and manufacturers at local, national and international levels within the sports, industrial, fashion, career wear and promotional markets. In 1999 Franklins Group acquired Brownlow Textiles Ltd., now known as Brownlows Linens. Brownlows is now a brand of Thomas Ferguson & Co. Ltd. and they specialize in household linen gifts and handkerchiefs, many with a strong ethnic Irish appeal.

In November, 2012 John England came under the same ownership as Thomas Ferguson. John England (Banbridge) Ltd. is a designer and wholesaler of apparel and interior fabrics, and carries a wide range of unique off-the-shelf linens.

In January, 2015 John England (Banbridge) Ltd. joined Franklins Group. Now as a sister company of Thomas Ferguson both companies are working very closely together. John England exclusively sells fabrics by the metre and adds a wide choice of unique stock fabrics for the fashion and apparel, curtain, upholstery, theatrical linens, film productions, etc. to the range. It also designs unique fabrics along with our customers.

 

"But at my back I always hear Time's wingd chariot hurrying near And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity."

Andrew Marvel 1621-1678 "To His Coy Mistress".